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Non-Skating Officials => General NSO Discussion => Topic started by: The Equalizer on June 14, 2012, 06:43:30 pm

Title: duties of head NSO in your league
Post by: The Equalizer on June 14, 2012, 06:43:30 pm
What are the duties of the head NSO in your league?  I'm currently training someone to be our head NSO i just want to make sure they have it all straight and i didn't miss anything
Title: Re: duties of head NSO in your league
Post by: Arithmetrix on June 14, 2012, 07:32:24 pm
1) Track NSO scrimmage attendance by position.
2) Determine training objectives for each individual based on the league needs, their abilities, and their status (i.e. fresh meat skater, freshie ref, or dedicated NSO).
3) Give them that training (requires knowing all the positions, of course).
4) Purchasing, tracking, repairing, replacing, and transporting all NSO equipment.
5) Our head ref generates and processes the bout paperwork but I distribute it, collect it, and answer any questions about it.  I'm sure some head NSOs generate and process it.
6) Staff bouts, this involves coordinating with tons of people to see who is available and inevitably having to replace or move people who complain or flake out.  Probably the most time-consuming element and the one I find most stressful.
7) Manage the NSO members as a first line short of formal disciplinary action (similar to coach or head ref except I have fewer people and our policies aren't yet finalized so this hasn't been an issue yet).

I also try to NSO for other leagues whenever my schedule allows - I'm sadly inexperienced for a head NSO but we are a first-year league so that is how it goes.
Title: Re: duties of head NSO in your league
Post by: Statsquatch on June 15, 2012, 05:14:00 pm
Two that aren't mentioned above but crucial:

As a head, the ref crew will appreciate you telling them in advance which numbers on the rosters are going to be trouble, if there are any last minute NSO issues/information(generally either people flaking or the position any non-skating ref is filling in case they need to be pulled due to an injury), and also just being genuinely knowledgeable of the venue. This gives all officials a second person to talk to/ask questions should the head ref be occupied with another task.

Additionally, it's important to have extra pencils, markers(sharpies and dry-erase), erasers, and stop watches in a centralized location. That way if there are any equipment failures, you know exactly where to send people to take care of it.
Title: Re: duties of head NSO in your league
Post by: Arithmetrix on June 15, 2012, 05:41:12 pm
Two that aren't mentioned above but crucial:

As a head, the ref crew will appreciate you telling them in advance which numbers on the rosters are going to be trouble, if there are any last minute NSO issues/information(generally either people flaking or the position any non-skating ref is filling in case they need to be pulled due to an injury), and also just being genuinely knowledgeable of the venue. This gives all officials a second person to talk to/ask questions should the head ref be occupied with another task.

Additionally, it's important to have extra pencils, markers(sharpies and dry-erase), erasers, and stop watches in a centralized location. That way if there are any equipment failures, you know exactly where to send people to take care of it.
Actually, our league head ref actively discourages this practice, and I agree with her.  If someone who was not her asked me this, I would state no opinion.  I consider it to be prejudicial.  I might have seen a skater in her first or worst bout, and she should be allowed to leave the past in the past.  If someone is truly "trouble", that will become evident quickly enough from the action as it actually occurs.
Title: Re: duties of head NSO in your league
Post by: SilkenTofu on June 15, 2012, 05:57:07 pm
I'm pretty sure what Stats meant is "this team has a 0, 100, and a 700, and the other team has a b00m and a 00 and an 0h and a w00t"...more number trouble than skater trouble.

And yes, all of the above.  Feel free to contact me if you have any questions or anything.  I've been Head NSO of a WFTDA league for three seasons now, as well as being Head NSO for a baby league this season, and have learned a lot through trial and error!
Title: Re: duties of head NSO in your league
Post by: Statsquatch on June 15, 2012, 06:20:40 pm
I'm pretty sure what Stats meant is "this team has a 0, 100, and a 700, and the other team has a b00m and a 00 and an 0h and a w00t"...more number trouble than skater trouble.

Yeah, that's what I exactly what I was referring to. Giving the refs a list of so that they know both teams have a 48, one team has an 84, and the other has a FOUR8. It's just a list of numbers they'll want to be sure they call very clearly since the trackers won't be able to easily say, "That must be one of yours, since I don't have that number."
Title: Re: duties of head NSO in your league
Post by: Arithmetrix on June 15, 2012, 08:54:37 pm
Oh, okay, thanks!  We have just had the "no profiling" emphasized so much that is where I went instantly.

I've found the IWB itself is the best place to stash extra supplies - you can fit everything and a cooler under there, so there is only one place to look really.

Yeah, last bout we had a 357 on both teams (I thought it was a batting average, apparently it is a gun).  Haven't hit a double "420" yet but it just seems to be a matter of time. 
Title: Re: duties of head NSO in your league
Post by: SmackTavish on July 24, 2012, 04:03:33 pm
For our league...
Bout week:
1. Contacting the league liason or the person compiling the bout booklet for the team rosters/colors.
2. Confirming the NSO roster.
3. Inputting the the team rosters/officials' rosters into the IBRF; printing the IBRF.
4. Writing the bout day to-do list for the NSOs.
5. Purchasing or washing the ref/scorekeeper/penalty tracker wrist bandanas.
6. Purchasing (if necessary) whiteboard markers, pencils, clipboards, tape (non-track tape but for posting the to-do list or for some other last-minute shenanigans), stopwatches.

Bout day:
1. Making certain all equipment is in place (IWB, penalty box chairs, OWBs).
2. Making certain the flamingos aren't just standing around taking up space. Our to-do list includes putting paperwork on clipboards, putting pencils with those, verifying the rosters and the captains/alternates (way before equipment checks), verifying everyone knows what they are doing, telling me repeatedly everything will be fine after the first whistle, taping out the outside whiteboard boxes, telling the fans that there's someone who stands in the OWB boxes, and anything else we can think of that hasn't been taken care of.
3. Holding onto the reporting form (either IBRF or USARS) and getting the appropriate signatures at the end of the bout.
4. Reminding the crew to remove their pink shirts if they're going out after the bout to celebrate.

All Other Weeks:
1. Recruiting new NSOs.
2. Training new NSOs at scrims.
3. Finding coverage for your role if you can't make a scrim (could be as simple as "here's the scrim paperwork, clipboards, pencils, stopwatches, and a whistle. good luck.")
4. Seeing what your crew can do and advising those who can "go to the next level" (such as a more difficult position, or adding in some tournament-level paperwork duties) that they could totally step up.
5. Going to scrims/bouts for other leagues either as a spectator or official. Going as a spectator can be just as much training as at a scrim. I usually pick one role I see doing a fantastic job and just stare at them. (Sorry, Tweedle Damn. I totally love watching you jam time. You're my hero.)
6. Setting up/maintaining a Google doc with extra (other than our weekly) scrim opportunities and our bouts as well as other local bouts to collect interest in helping out. This has been invaluable and was an idea from one of my Penalty Trackers, Chops, and it's cut my organization time down to about an eighth of what it was.