Zebra Huddleâ„¢

WFTDA => General Ref Discussion => Topic started by: Bishop on May 23, 2009, 01:46:18 pm

Title: Re: What backup equipment do you carry? (split from: Equipment malfunction (!) -
Post by: Bishop on May 23, 2009, 01:46:18 pm
There's a good reason so many skaters have 265s: they rock.

~j.z.

I've been eyeing those Riedell Black Widow skates for awhile now.  That's got the 695 skate boot.  I'm thinking that the only difference between the 695 and the 265 boot is the Velcro strap?  I currently have some Riedell R3 Demons which have a Velcro strap but am thinking of upgrading.  I like the strap - does anyone have any particular reason for liking the 265 boot over the 695?

Also, what does everyone think about the Powerdyne Reactor plates?  The idea of knowing what setting I have my trucks set to really appeals to me.  Are there better plates out there that would allow me to do the same thing?  
Title: Re: What backup equipment do you carry? (split from: Equipment malfunction (!) -
Post by: DayGlo Divine on May 23, 2009, 03:56:54 pm
There's a good reason so many skaters have 265s: they rock.

~j.z.

I've been eyeing those Riedell Black Widow skates for awhile now.  That's got the 695 skate boot.  I'm thinking that the only difference between the 695 and the 265 boot is the Velcro strap?  I currently have some Riedell R3 Demons which have a Velcro strap but am thinking of upgrading.  I like the strap - does anyone have any particular reason for liking the 265 boot over the 695?

Also, what does everyone think about the Powerdyne Reactor plates?  The idea of knowing what setting I have my trucks set to really appeals to me.  Are there better plates out there that would allow me to do the same thing?  

Both the 695 and the 265 have the strap. 695s are lined with leather instead of fabric; they're hard as hell to break in, but they mold to your feet a lot more.

I have Reactors (among others; I'm a "collector"). They're better than DynaPros, but not $180 better, and the cushions are known for their lack of durability and consistent durometer. The nuts have little numbers on them so you have some idea what they're set to. A lot of Roll-Line plates have click action, where the nut makes a clicking sound when you turn it. I find both of these things pretty useless myself; I can get the trucks to within a half-turn of where they ideally should be without thinking.
Title: Re: What backup equipment do you carry? (split from: Equipment malfunction (!) -
Post by: Skillz on May 28, 2009, 06:02:29 am
I am a fan of the R3 that Riedell makes but the one thing on nylon plates you also must look for is a stress crack in the middle of the front truck. A common sign that this has occured is that one day the truck will pop out of the pivot hole (front hole). Usually for people I sell R3's to (because of the affordability to new skaters) I go ahead and replace all rivets with bolts and adjust the trucks for each skater. Too many people take skates out the box and their trucks are way too loose.

Title: Re: What backup equipment do you carry? (split from: Equipment malfunction (!) -
Post by: DayGlo Divine on May 28, 2009, 06:34:03 am
I am a fan of the R3 that Riedell makes but the one thing on nylon plates you also must look for is a stress crack in the middle of the front truck. A common sign that this has occured is that one day the truck will pop out of the pivot hole (front hole). Usually for people I sell R3's to (because of the affordability to new skaters) I go ahead and replace all rivets with bolts and adjust the trucks for each skater. Too many people take skates out the box and their trucks are way too loose.

Unless something's changed, R3s ship with mounting bolts instead of rivets. The ones I bought 2 years ago for the guy I was dating at the time did, anyway. And if anything, trucks are usually waaaaaay too tight out of the box. But I guess a lot depends on the individual. I know this much: while I'm not a skate snob, and while I have a particularly soft spot for cheap old single-action plates like Sure-Grip Invaders, I draw the line at Riedell's nylon plates. Won't skate on them, and yell at anyone I know who gets new skates with them. I have seen them break in exactly the manner you've described. On top of that, they warp over time, and if they're in a longer size, you can flex them by hand. I don't consider myself a rock-star skater by any stretch of the imagination, but I nonetheless managed to wear out and outgrow those plates in a year. Almost anything out there is better, and my both my control and the power I got from my strides increased noticeably when I switched to aluminum plates.
Title: Re: What backup equipment do you carry? (split from: Equipment malfunction (!) -
Post by: howie~swerve on May 28, 2009, 06:58:35 am
On top of that, they warp over time, and if they're in a longer size, you can flex them by hand. I don't consider myself a rock-star skater by any stretch of the imagination, but I nonetheless managed to wear out and outgrow those plates in a year. Almost anything out there is better, and my both my control and the power I got from my strides increased noticeably when I switched to aluminum plates.

and everything DayGlo just said goes double if you're, say, twice DayGlo's weight (at least!), with plates twice as long and skating on them for twice as long.  after two years on the nylon plates I could have twisted them into animal shapes.   All the flexing they're doing is energy that's being lost between you and the floor.  the bigger you are, the faster you will turn your nylon into spaghetti.

h~
Title: Re: What backup equipment do you carry? (split from: Equipment malfunction (!) -
Post by: Skillz on May 28, 2009, 09:55:51 pm
I am a fan of the R3 that Riedell makes but the one thing on nylon plates you also must look for is a stress crack in the middle of the front truck. A common sign that this has occured is that one day the truck will pop out of the pivot hole (front hole). Usually for people I sell R3's to (because of the affordability to new skaters) I go ahead and replace all rivets with bolts and adjust the trucks for each skater. Too many people take skates out the box and their trucks are way too loose.

Unless something's changed, R3s ship with mounting bolts instead of rivets. The ones I bought 2 years ago for the guy I was dating at the time did, anyway. And if anything, trucks are usually waaaaaay too tight out of the box. But I guess a lot depends on the individual. I know this much: while I'm not a skate snob, and while I have a particularly soft spot for cheap old single-action plates like Sure-Grip Invaders, I draw the line at Riedell's nylon plates. Won't skate on them, and yell at anyone I know who gets new skates with them. I have seen them break in exactly the manner you've described. On top of that, they warp over time, and if they're in a longer size, you can flex them by hand. I don't consider myself a rock-star skater by any stretch of the imagination, but I nonetheless managed to wear out and outgrow those plates in a year. Almost anything out there is better, and my both my control and the power I got from my strides increased noticeably when I switched to aluminum plates.

Problem is trying to find a plate that has the exact same wheel base (distance from the center of front and read axles) I know someone makes them but I dont have the money to keep buying plates till I find what I like. I bought a set of new Powerdynes on a 8 plate but it feels like so much of my foot is hanging over the front wheels and it throws my balance off. I agree with everything you say Dayglo, its just I love the shoe on the R3 for its comfort and have switched that shoe to other plates like an invader (longer wheel base) and cant get the desired feel.