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Author Topic: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam  (Read 8513 times)

Offline Wheels Bohr

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Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« on: December 17, 2012, 06:56:22 pm »
I received a GoPro helmet cam for my birthday and have been able to use it in four non-sactioned bouts so far and I've reviewed the videos from all of them. Going back and watching in slow motion it has been all too easy to find missed calls, overcalls (1-2 per game), or questionable calls that should have been downgraded. Rather than list all the mistakes in each bout I'll post about what I've learned from reviewing my own first-person reffing.

What I learned:
  • Video can be very humbling, but also enlightening.
  • Keeping zen-like focus is needed to see the beginning, middle and end of a penalty.
  • Positioning is critical (ok, everyone already knew that but it's true).
  • Trust what you see or don't see, your gut reaction is what they mean when they say you need to be 100% sure on a call. There will be blatantly obvious penalties right in front of you that are not in your line of sight.
  • OPR's are very very important.
  • Practice jamnesia which is necessary for focus.
  • Be proud of all the calls and no-calls you made right in a bout. It's amazing what we are able to process and execute in real time, only focusing on the negative would be disheartening and unbalanced.

Anyone else want to share their experience of watching their own reffing? Do you share your video or list of comments with your crew, or the participating leagues?
In my case I upload the video to an unlisted YouTube and share the links with the captains and crew. I'm undecided about sharing my mistakes to the captains, on the one hand they are clearly visible to anyone wanting to see, but on the other hand why draw attention to things I recognized and plan to improve?
Wheels Bohr
Tallahassee RollerGirls

Offline Bishop

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Improving your officiating with the help of a helmet camera.
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2012, 07:42:17 pm »
There.  Reframed that thread subject for ya.  ;)

I've used helmet camera for several years now so I'll add my thoughts.

I received a GoPro helmet cam for my birthday and have been able to use it in four non-sactioned bouts so far and I've reviewed the videos from all of them. Going back and watching in slow motion it has been all too easy to find missed calls, overcalls (1-2 per game), or questionable calls that should have been downgraded. Rather than list all the mistakes in each bout I'll post about what I've learned from reviewing my own first-person reffing.

What I learned:
  • Video can be very humbling, but also enlightening.
There is no better critic than a helmet camera.  Provided you know what you're calling and why.  There's nothing quite like being able to replay the footage and direct your focal vision to a part of the action that had been in your peripheral vision in real-time.
Quote
  • Keeping zen-like focus is needed to see the beginning, middle and end of a penalty.
Yes.  Fudging any one of those will get you in trouble.  You also don't want to stare down the "tree" at the expense of seeing the "forrest."   Watch the game, call what you see.
Quote
  • Positioning is critical (ok, everyone already knew that but it's true).
Probably can't be overstated or stated enough.  It's so important!  Provided your positioning isn't clearly wrong, you're still always scarificing the best angle for calling "X" by being in position "Y".
Quote
  • Trust what you see or don't see, your gut reaction is what they mean when they say you need to be 100% sure on a call. There will be blatantly obvious penalties right in front of you that are not in your line of sight.
Yes.  This is why there are seven referees.  Do you job and let other referees do theirs.  I have an excellent clip that illustrates why this is so critically important.   
Quote
  • OPR's are very very important.
Indeed.  See previous comment.  ;)
Quote
  • Practice jamnesia which is necessary for focus.
If there's one thing helmet cam has taught me, it's that my subjective determination of my performance is almost always off.  There's no point in obsessing over a missed call. 
Quote
  • Be proud of all the calls and no-calls you made right in a bout. It's amazing what we are able to process and execute in real time, only focusing on the negative would be disheartening and unbalanced.
Meh.  I'm just doing my job by making correct calls and no-calls.  Conversely, incorrect calls are part of the game and part of being human.  There's no point in getting too high about the good calls or too low about the bads calls.

Anyone else want to share their experience of watching their own reffing? Do you share your video or list of comments with your crew, or the participating leagues?
In my case I upload the video to an unlisted YouTube and share the links with the captains and crew. I'm undecided about sharing my mistakes to the captains, on the one hand they are clearly visible to anyone wanting to see, but on the other hand why draw attention to things I recognized and plan to improve?

I have mixed feelings about sharing footage with Captains or skaters.  I've done it but I'm still undecided on whether or not it's a good idea.  To some extent, it probably depends on the individuals you're sharing the footage with.  Some of them don't understand the rules or how the game must be called.  Some get it and understand that no one is 100% all the time. 

« Last Edit: December 17, 2012, 08:20:45 pm by Bishop »
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Offline HIM-roid

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Re: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2012, 07:48:04 pm »
My personal thoughts on this are:
I would only use it for MY knowledge/feedback.
I would not share it with anyone other than myself. I appreciate you sharing the links with me from the Belle Ringer which I think is very brave of you. You open yourself up for criticism from anyone who has access to it. This can be used differently from your intentions to burn you in the long run. As you said, the cam catches EVERYTHING, including things that aren't/weren't in your line of sight. Every time I have reviewed bout footage with a team, they start shouting about how shitty the officiating is because they missed this and that penalty that was taken from a camera outside of the track, farther away than what the officials are so the wider angle shows more of the track area. It took me about 3 or 4 bout reviews to make the girls understand that the angle the officials are looking at is only a tenth of what you are seeing and we are always scanning the pack/play area because we have limited sight. They finally got it but I think it was only because I am hard headed enough to continue the "discussion" with them until they saw my point. and truth be known, when I started pointing out how many penalties they got away with that weren't called, they accepted the one or two missed for them versus the 5 or 6 against them. Sad but true. I am glad that you aren't beating yourself up too bad over the calls that you got wrong, but remember, at slow motion things look differently and having multiple chances to look at the same action helps drastically. We get one shot at making the call at full speed. If we get it right, good job. If we don't, well, we know to look or concentrate a little harder next time. I love going back and watching my performance so I can get better and I use to get pissed off at myself when I blew a call. I finally realized that hey, I didn't realize I was human until today and I was capable of making errors. LOL
HIM-roid
WFTDA Apprentice Officials Area Coordinator
Head of Officiating
Mississippi Rollergirls
WFTDA-Certified Referee, Level 2
WFTDA Officials Apprentice Program Area Coordinator

Offline Darkjester

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Re: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2012, 08:31:26 pm »
Madness Tolls
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Offline reflmao

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Re: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2012, 09:08:15 pm »
I was Roc City's League HR when we started using a helmet cam at every home bout.

Wheels Bohr pretty much covered many of the lessons we learned. 

We always watched the footage with all the officials as a group and within a couple of days of the bout.  Watching and discussing as a group adds a few other benefits.

* The HNSO had the paperwork and could confirm the paperwork to the video and respond to any questions. 
* Teamwork issues could be discussed about what works and what doesn't.
*  Sometimes rules interpretations and misconceptions come out during this process.  Both on the part of the official wearing the camera and other officials as well.  This is a great time to get every one on the same page about any of these issues.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 12:31:02 am by reflmao »
RCRD, Rochester, NY

Offline Wheels Bohr

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Re: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2012, 09:16:37 pm »
There.  Reframed that thread subject for ya.  ;)

I've used helmet camera for several years now so I'll add my thoughts.
...

Thanks, very good points all around.

Regarding sharing the footage, I feel that if I'm recording someone they should have access to it. So while I understand HIM-roid's warnings, it does not seem appropriate to consider it your personal property. It seems if I want to have the benefit of reviewing footage the cost is having that available to anyone who participated (see: thread on skater permission). I would say the answer to skaters or coaches that might use the video to complain is to be willing to discuss it with them and just be open about mistakes or their misunderstandings.

This can be used differently from your intentions to burn you in the long run.
I'm thinking about how this could happen, and if it's a valid concern. I suppose if a level 5 ref had all their bouts archived someone could make a montage of bad calls but I think everyone in Derby would recognize the bad is far outweighed by the good. But I'm an optimist :-D

We always watched the footage with all the officials as a group and within a couple of days of the bout.
...
I love the idea of going over the footage together. I assume this is just from the rear IPR? Is this outside of practice? It takes me a while to review so not sure how popular that would be, but it sounds great.
Wheels Bohr
Tallahassee RollerGirls

Offline Celtic Raider

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Re: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2012, 10:13:49 pm »
I've had my camera for the entire season this year and recorded almost every bout I could.

At our end of season bash, I cut all the bouts into one enormous video that looped the whole night.  People drifted in and out of the viewing area and as I came and went, I would watch, call out the penalties and then see my arms making the motion I just called out on the video.  So it's helped to reinforce that the calls I made, I got right.  But then I also heard players comment on "That penalty got missed", or "Where's the call ref" and others like that and my reply was "I called what I saw."  Players and refs have to remember that you don't see everything (like Him said) that you see on the camera so while my head is pointing one way, my eyes might be somewhere else.

Mostly what I do is review the footage and take out bits and pieces for ref training.  I've done several videos that show penalties and explain why it's a penalty, how it could be avoided, things to watch for when making that call, etc.

But I will always record my bouts from now on, just so I can relive the bout since I rarely remember anything but the major "highlights" of the game and see how I've gotten better as a ref.

Offline reflmao

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Re: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2012, 12:47:53 am »
I love the idea of going over the footage together. I assume this is just from the rear IPR? Is this outside of practice? It takes me a while to review so not sure how popular that would be, but it sounds great.

We do occasionally wear the camera in internal scrimmages, but in this case I'm talking about full, public, even sanctioned bouts.   We don't do a group review of a scrim, for many of them we don't have a single person that does a full viewing of the HC footage.  Mostly we seek out specific moments that we recall as interesting.

In bouts we have put the camera on every skating ref position.  Part of our goal here is reviewing both that ref's performance, our crew's performance, and our group understanding of issues.  There are some positions like JR where you get a reduced view of the overall flow of the game but there's a lot of other value in it.  We've even put a camera on our wrangler once.   He's super good and we wanted to see the game from his view. 

When watching the video as a group we do not stop to confirm and slo-mo every call.  We watch generally just watch full speed. We each kinda walk in with moments we're  interested in that we'll slo-mo and repeat and if we see something interesting we'll do the same.

As a general point, some people don't see the value for themselves wearing the camera and some people have a hard time being scrutinized that closely.  But I really feel that those that do tend to really up their game after a couple of passes.   
RCRD, Rochester, NY

Offline Senor Ahzov

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Re: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2016, 02:13:21 pm »
I only use my helmet cam at scrimmages, and only then as a self-training tool. I'll stop-and-start the video after a call/no-call that I'm not sure about (either the scenario in front of me or the rule itself), then just review the last 30 seconds of each clip. Far more often than not, I see that the call/no-call I made at the time was the right one.

I'm also not giving myself grief over anything that I have to watch at half speed, or watch more than twice, in order to see what happened or what I should have called. Even if it turns out it was a penalty.

And skaters don't get to video review calls they think we missed, because we don't want them focussing on the one we might have got wrong rather than the fifty calls we made that they didn't notice, and then losing faith in the Refs.

Offline Mav'Ricky

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Re: Finding mistakes with a helmet cam
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2016, 12:10:09 am »
I'm a big fan of using footage review and have used it extensively in my first two years of derby refereeing and more recently (at the request of the captains) at my new league. All scrims - minus the between jam stuff.

The skaters use it to review their performance and I use it to review mine.

It can take a while for everyone to get used to the footage. There are a couple of things I say that may help in the situation where viewers cite missed calls etc:
1. You can't see everything on video
2. The ref at the time may have had a better angle
3. If you (the viewer) are going to criticise the officiating then you can only watch footage at full speed, then see how much you can pick up. As officials we don't have the power during the scrim to slow things down and replay.
4. It's true, things get missed and skaters might sit for penalties they believe were unwarranted. However that's just how we (officials) saw it at the time, and that's what we went with. Unfortunately, you don't get the 30 seconds back.
5. The overall benefits of footage far outweigh the possible negative aspects. Specifically skaters can use footage to evaluate how a certain strategy went, that they practised earlier on in the week, and tweak it next time at training.

Some funny things I've heard skaters say when watching footage review
"OMG why am I just standing there! Do something! Go help the jammer."
"And there goes the jammer again..."

Fi Agee as posted above, footage gives you a really good objective view of your game, separate to the subjective view you form yourself.

The latest thing I use footage review for is to watch the good positioning of other refs so I can improve.
Be fair. Be clear.

 

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